Cairo Declaration: Managing Africa’s natural capital for sustainable development and poverty eradication


Date: 
11 May 2015
Organisation: 
AMCEN
Core CAP document type: 
Conference document type: 

We, African ministers of the environment, having met in Cairo from 4 to 6 March 2015 at the fifteenth session of the African Ministerial Conference on the Environment,

Recognizing the commendable role that the Conference has played in the 30 years since its establishment in Cairo in 1985, especially in facilitating consensus-building and enhancing Africa’s effective participation in global and regional dialogue and action for the achievement of the continent’s environmental and sustainable development interests,

Recalling the outcome document of the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20), entitled “The future we want”,

Recognizing that the Rio+20 Conference reaffirmed the Rio principles on sustainable development as contained in the Rio Declaration on Environment and Development made at the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development in 1992,

Welcoming the special declaration of the Assembly of the African Union at its twenty-fourth ordinary session, held in Addis Ababa on 30 and 31 January 2015, on illicit financial flows,

Welcoming also the decision of the Assembly at its twenty-third ordinary session, held in Malabo on 26 and 27 June 2014, on the post-2015 development agenda,

Welcoming further the decision of the Assembly at its twenty-fourth ordinary session on the report of the High-level Committee on the Post-2015 Development Agenda,

Welcoming the decision of the Assembly at its twenty-third ordinary session in which it decided that the African Peer Review Mechanism should be an autonomous entity within the African Union system,

Recalling the decision of the Assembly at its twenty-second ordinary session, held in Addis Ababa on 30 and 31 January 2014, approving the 2050 Africa’s Integrated Maritime Strategy ,

Recognizing that disaster risk reduction is a pillar for the integration of ecosystems and climate change requiring a multisectoral approach in order to be effective and that disasters are increasingly causing ecosystem degradation leading to loss of lives and investment,

Recalling the establishment in Johannesburg, South Africa, in June 2008 of the African chapter of the African Women Ministers and Leaders for the Environment to promote gender responsive sustainable environmental management within Africa and enhance representation and involvement of women in decision-making in the areas of environment and sustainable development at all levels,

Recognizing that hydrofluorocarbons are not ozone-depleting substances and that the implementation of the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer is leading to an increase in the production and consumption of these substances and that the phase-down of hydrofluorocarbons has environmental benefits,

Noting, however, that for Africa, the limited availability of alternatives to hydrofluorocarbons and the need for effective mechanisms for technology transfer and adequate funding from the Multilateral Fund for the implementation of the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer require in-depth consideration,

Recalling resolution 1/5, on chemicals and waste, of the United Nations Environment Assembly of the United Nations Environment Programme,

Noting the outcomes of the African Sustainable Transport Forum Action Framework, adopted by ministers of the environment and transport at the first ministerial meeting of the Framework, held in Nairobi from 28 to 30 October 2014,

Welcoming the Arusha Outcomes, the main findings and recommendations of the First African Regional Mountains Forum, organized by the Albertine Rift Conservation Society, the Africa Mountain Partnership Champions Committee, the East African Community, the United Nations Environment Programme, the Austrian Development Cooperation and the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation in Arusha from 22 to 24 October 2014,

Recognizing that air pollution contributes to more than 7 million premature deaths worldwide every year, with an estimated 776,000 deaths occurring in Africa from both indoor and outdoor air pollution, and that poor air quality is a cross-cutting issue and negatively impedes sustainable development in all economic sectors, people’s productivity and health,

Acknowledging that green economy can be a vehicle to achieve all 17 draft sustainable development goals and that increasing investments will help in achieving the economic, social and environmental goals outlined by the global community,

Recognizing the nexus between land productivity, food security and poverty eradication in Africa,

Recalling the Rio+20 outcomes to monitor land degradation and restore degraded lands in accordance with the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification,

Welcoming the decision of the Assembly of the African Union at its twenty-third ordinary session, by which it adopted the Protocol on Amendments to the Protocol on the Statute of the African Court of Justice and Human Rights,

Welcoming also the decision of the Assembly at its twenty-fourth ordinary session on Africa’s engagement at the United Nations Climate Summit, held in New York in September 2014, and at the twentieth session of the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, held in Lima in December 2014,

Recognizing that Africa’s natural capital is crucial to supporting human, animal and plant life, in addition to its considerable capacity for wealth creation,

Hereby declare our resolve:

*  Readers can access the complete text of the Cairo Declaration here. 

*  Readers can access the complete set of documentation from the 15th Session of the African Ministerial Conference on the Environment (AMCEN) here.

Déclaration du Caire sur la gestion du capital naturel de l’Afrique au service du développement durable et de l’élimination de la pauvreté